Cool People, Cool Thoughts: Women’s March PGH)

(PSA this was originally posted on my other blog, meowcoolia.wordpress.com – but the more people see it, the better)

Two days ago marked the day when millions of women and men of all distinctions took to the streets in a mission to showcase to the world that our rights, as humans, aren’t “up for grabs”, a sign I saw quite a few times. Anyway, the march demonstrated a sentiment far past hate, far past anger. The feeling in the air could be described as hope, perhaps support. Everyone attended for their own specific reasons, but often times these reasons were to support the people that they loved, but more importantly, the people that they’ve never met. Here are some of the great people that I was fortunate enough to meet last Saturday at the Pittsburgh Women’s March:

ddaywashjeff-edu

“I marched today to set an example of civic engagement for my daughters, Megan and Emily. I marched today for my mother, Chris, born in and witness to the injustices of  the Jim Crow south. I marched today for my father, Reed, who believed in and fought for civil rights. I marched today for my sisters Karen, Loren, and Kristen so we can continue to work towards a better tomorrow for all women of the world.  I marched today for my nieces Laura, Sarah, Anna, Claire, Krystyna, Hannah, Christina,  Melissa,  and Ann as they continue their journey into an  engaged and responsible adulthood. I marched today for my great-niece Lydia and my boyfriend’s daughter, Emily, that through their lives they might witness a great change in the world. I marched today for hope.”
saliforthgmail“This was not me protesting against our President – I did that verbally and with my vote and money prior to the election.  This was a MARCH of unity to show my respect, love and willingness to stand up for everything that I believe in that made America already a great Nation.  Someone else posted this quote today and I’m sharing it with you –  “Love is the
only force capable of transforming an enemy into a friend” and “I have decided to stick with love. Hate is too great a burden to bear.” -Martin Luther King Jr. #WomensMarch #LoveTrumpsHate.   And by the way I didn’t March out of fear I marched because of hope, empathy, compassion, love and to show my community that I am willing to show my face and be heard for those values.This was not me protesting against our President – I did that verbally and with my vote and money prior to the election.  This was a MARCH of unity to show my respect, love and willingness to stand up for everything that I believe in that made America already a great Nation.  Someone else posted this quote today and I’m sharing it with you –  “Love is the only force capable of transforming an enemy into a friend” and “I have decided to stick with love. Hate is too great a burden to bear.” -Martin Luther King Jr. #WomensMarch #LoveTrumpsHate.   And by the way I didn’t March out of fear I marched because of hope, empathy, compassion, love and to show my community that I am willing to show my face and be heard for those values.”

“Our little group originally signed up for the bus to DC, but our chosen bus was cancelled.  We then decided to do the sister march in Pittsburgh and ended up being so impressed with the attendance! We had heard that it was only going to be 400 of us or so. Our friend had told us how many folks were on the trolley on the way in, but still we were thinking small scale. Imagine our surprise as more and more folks came! They weren’t going to close the streets, but then they had to. What a great feeling and a then a feel good sensation as we discovered that we were being united with women all across the globe! I never felt more in a sisterhood. We were able to protest peacefully and still get our point across. How annoying is it that Don asked why didn’t we vote.

We can Overcome!!! Women will not let themselves go backwards in time.”

artaddict73yahoo-kristenhossargmail

“I marched because I’m saddened, angry, scared, and disappointed in the path that the Presidency and Congress are trying to take.  I look at all the decades of work that women and minority or disenfranchised groups have done to make the country a better place for *all* of us — and I see these assholes wanting to dismantle it all in the name of nationalism and personal wealth.  I know the majority of Americans didn’t want this — our “democracy” isn’t terribly democratic — and I wanted to stand with others who shared my beliefs and concerns and hopes.”

“I decided to march for many reasons, but I’ll try to limit myself. As as someone who is both handicapped and disabled (three major back surgeries and myriad chronic pain conditions), I cannot imagine what my life would be like if I did not have health care – a reality that is now being faced by millions and is evidenced by one of our new president’s first official actions.

As a librarian, I am frightened by the way facts and information are being blatantly disregarded despite being easily verifiable. If we stop holding our officials accountable when they are clearly misrepresenting the truth – as is made clear by new press secretary Sean Spicer’s first official press conference- then we invite greater degrees of deception to take root.

As a lifelong LBGT+ ally, I cannot fathom treating anyone differently based on who they love, nor do I think someone who at the very least turns a blind eye to conversion therapy should be the second most powerful person in our country.

And as a woman, I will not stand for my own choices about my body being more regulated than the sale and use of firearms.

My heart was filled at the Women’s March on Pittsburgh, and I hope it has given us the strength and resolve we need to keep working towards change!”

dancing_lotusyahoo

“As one of my favorite signs at today’s march boldly stated, “I don’t even know where to start.”

I came out today to feel the unity, acceptance, tolerance, and to be another body out there showing that these things truly matter.

Pittsburgh has focused on sports for way too long, and it was unbelievably uniting today, to come together for something that actually matters.

(Like not accepting an openly racist bigot as our president)

I cried, you cried, so many other ladies were crying, but all in joy!  We were all so moved by the warm and loving energy!

I finally feel like a part of this town, and I’ve lived here for almost my entire life of 30+ years.

But more importantly, I hope and believe that everyone else that marched today does too.

Let’s keep this fire burning, Pittsburgh!  Bring it out into your community.  Share it every chance you get.

Mobilize, organize, and above all, keep loving one another!”

franca-critgmail-maggieswitzergmail

“I was violently raped when I was 16. The only people who supported me through the trauma were the women I worked with at Planned Parenthood. I march so rape survivors know they matter, so Planned Parenthood can survive,  so marginalized people know I support them. I believe being silent in the mouth of trauma is an act of violence.”

ronbarron9gmail

“I believe in the equality of men and women. My marriage of 57 years has been an equal partnership. That’s why it’s a joy. I believe that women are the key to world peace and should be the majority of every government. Men have had power for centuries and, as I see it, have screwed up most of the time.

The sign I made for the Women’s March is a statement of my belief that racism is a cancer that must be eradicated before world harmony will be achieved.

What happened worldwide on this historic day is a rejection of the abhorrent agenda of Donald Trump. I’m glad I was a part of it.”

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